47 people indicted in college admissions cheating and recruitment scheme


(Patrick) #1

Oh…look…UT Tennis coach got grabbed.






#2

Oh, tennis? UT only cares about their football team.


#3

Nice to see the tax break the rich got not going to just hoes and nose candy. There was a big nose candy bust in a port in NY that upset a bunch of folks on Wall st.


(Dustin K) #4

Didn’t know that the SAT was still paper and pencil. Seems like they are behind the times.


#5

Well it would be even worse if it was taken online or through a computer. These affluent people could payoff a hacker to take the test or change the score.


#6

Y’all make it sound like it’s a bad thing to be affluent.


#7

I suppose it depends on what you do with your affluence. Does “Let them eat cake” ring a bell?


#8

Sure. I’m familiar with the saying but think it’s more in keeping with current times it’s about working hard, getting ahead and enjoying life. I don’t have a problem with being successful or seeing others being successful.


#9

I don’t think that is what the 47 people indicted was all about. I think it was the opposite. Don’t you?


(Patrick) #10

I know numerous USC alums with close ties to the football program, and they all use the same phrase to describe the athletic department — a country club. Which seems an even more apropos description today given the extent to which wealth and privilege fueled the fraudulent admissions scheme.

But they use it more to describe the chummy, elitist mindset by which only members of the “USC Family” get to be part of the inner circle. It’s how former players with no qualifications get to run the athletic departments, and why the past three underwhelming football coaches, Lane Kiffin, Steve Sarkisian and Helton — all had previous Trojans experience.

It’s a sweet arrangement if you’re sitting in one of those plush suites at the newly renovated L.A. Coliseum. Not so much if you’re one of the hundreds of thousands of regular USC fans who just want to see the Trojans A) win and B) not be a national laughingstock.


(Dustin K) #11

Taking the CPA exam at a testing center, they check my ID, get my finger prints, then I have a personalized launch code, I assume it is pretty secure from hackers but nothing is fool proof. Plus having a third party administrator of the test center basically gives them financial incentive to be secure or they would end up out of business.


(Patrick) #12

Federal tax documents show that Key Worldwide Foundation, a California-based nonprofit that federal prosecutors allege funneled bribes from wealthy parents to get their children into prestigious universities, donated a total of $546,500 in 2015 and 2016 to “University of Texas Athletics.” The amount represents the largest sum that the foundation reported giving to any school during those years.

But the university only has record of a $15,000 donation in June 2015 for an outdoor tennis facility, according to UT-Austin spokesman J.B. Bird. Otherwise, the university’s records do not match the donation amounts reported in the foundation’s records, Bird said in a statement.


(Patrick) #13

Williams, 44, is accused of accepting bribes to facilitate the cheating at what is referred to in court documents as the “Houston Test Center.” She was arrested and charged with conspiracy to commit racketeering Tuesday and was released on a $20,000 bond, according to records . She is scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston on March 25.

“We are aware that a staff member has been implicated. The Houston Independent School District does not condone any form of academic dishonesty,” the Houston Independent School District stated. “We will cooperate with authorities and we will look into this matter to determine if any of our students have been affected in any way.”