Briles talking with Florida State


(gpropes) #1

He’s not just on a theoretical list of candidates, apparently he’s actually had conversations with Florida State. Their OC just left to be the head coach at UMass.


#2

Damn! Here we go again.


#3

Life in the G5…stinks…it is why winning big is the ONLY option @UH these days…no time to waste…P5 or bust


#4

The sooner he goes the better.


#5

It’s not just the G5. There are plenty of bottom dwelling P5 programs not worth an OC’s time and effort to pursue. That said, I do wish in this day and time, a signed contract actually meant a professional commitment to a program and not use it as leverage to gain more money and career advancement before the ink is dried.


(Jeff Berger) #6

As a fan, I do too. On the other hand, hard to blame these coaches, since a fan base can turn on a coach in one bad season, and their livelihood is gone.


#7

This is life in today’s college football world.


(DERRICK KATELY) #8

Contracts used to mean something…you need to honor your contract. Why don’t schools sue for breach of contract???


(Brad) #9

Just let him go. We just paid you a ton of money. Damn.


#10

Just sucks for the kids. They don’t know what to expect at the end of each season.
I hope we’ve been actively searching for another OC as much as Briles has been searching for another school. At this point our backup plans need backup plans. Can never be over-prepared.


#11

Because there’s a buyout and because the school can fire you at will if you have a bad season. You can’t ask coaches to be loyal and then turn around and can them.


#12

I’m also all for coaches exploring their options, but once you sign a contract you should be legally bound by that contract. If a coach is unsure if he’ll get more offers, then he shouldn’t sign. Our officials shouldn’t have to be waiting in limbo due to personal endeavors of a single coach. That’s time we could be using to search for another candidate. Now the whole team suffers because a single person’s mind isn’t made up.


#13

So then you’d be up for not firing them during the duration of the contract?


(DERRICK KATELY) #14

Why sign if you are still looking…not like you have some trashy low paying job making enough to stay in your apartment or being underpaid. Just be upfront and refuse the signing. Now you have caused UH to be in a situation this late in the season.


#15

There’s a clause in there about production expectation right? C’mon, you’re better than this.


#16

Production? They don’t work in a factory. You going to factor in injuries in that “production.” That’s so asinine. Unless you list specific win totals then it’s left up to interpretation.


(Chris Vaughan) #17

When you read these things, it’s good to take with a grain of salt. 1) You don’t know the writer’s timeline, was it before or after the new contract? 2) Preliminary talks, to means, the agent has spoken to FSU as they gauge interest.

To me all this is nonsense especially with an OC contract at #21 in all of college football.


#18

Because a good job can come open during your contract. You should pass up a HC job and just wait?


#19

You fire them, still got to pay them…


(Bryant Hargrave) #20

All coaching contracts are made with outs for both parties. With some modicum of protections. IE the buyout. Either for the school to terminate for ineffectiveness or for the coach greener pastures. It sticks that it’s happening so soon, but that’s the way of the world.

I think we all abide by the adage the best time to be looking for a job, is when you have one.

I’ll also add this may be a generational thing too. I mean loyalty in the coaching ranks is always suspect. Across all ages. But Kendall is pretty close to my age a bit older but not by a lot. So my perspective is that one should never be too loyal to an employer. You should go to work and do your absolute best, of course. But you should always be looking for your next step up.

I’ve seen far too many great working and loyal for lack of a better term “company men/women” end up right along side of me in filing for unemployment when the employer decided they were no longer useful.