The NCAA listened after college basketball coaches complained about changing recruiting rules


(Patrick) #1

In July, coaches will be moved from from three weekends to one when it comes to attending sanctioned, non-scholastic (so-called “AAU”) events. The earliest five-day July evaluation period will remain in place; coaches will still be able to attend Nike’s Peach Jam and other non-scholastic tournaments in that window. The month itself is shrinking from three recruiting weekends to two, with the second featuring camp-style events that will be coordinated by the NCAA, USA Basketball, the NBA and the NBA Players Association.

According to the proposal that’s expected to pass on Aug. 8, the camps will include approximately 1,100 high school seniors, potentially as many as 1,000 juniors and significantly lower number of elite sophomores. High school freshmen will not be invited.

Prior to July, though, coaches will get a bonus recruiting opportunity in April. For the past decade-plus, coaches have evaluated and recruited prospects on the road once or twice in April (depending on how the calendar falls). April’s evaluation calendar will remain the same, but if the proposal passes as anticipated, per the source, in-home visits for coaches will be allowed after on-the-road eval periods conclude. As the rule stands now, home visits for recruits are not allowed until a prospect completes their scholastic junior year of high school and, typically, don’t take place until the fall of a prospect’s senior year.

As for June, coaches will be allowed to go on the road for two three-day periods at the end of the month. The events will be scholastic-oriented (meaning apparel companies cannot be involved), with the focus on rekindling relationships and connections between college and high school coaches.

All amendments on the table are intended to take effect in 2019. Tweaks to forthcoming legislation could be implemented in a year’s time, or perhaps in 2020, after the NCAA and its membership monitor how the changes take shape in a markedly different era for college basketball.