UNC Scandal(s)


#81

The hypocrisy from many people following this story is gross. I know for a fact that something similar to this happened at UH for the freshman level courses. You had regular students bragging about a football player letting them borrow a study guide with all the answers to the test. It was not made available to the whole class.

I would bet this goes on in many schools, just like the paying players schemes. At the end of the day this is the bigger and better version of the g league and minor league baseball. These schools make millions in revenue and advertising by being the farm system for pro leagues. The classes mean nothing when it gets in the way of wins and big $$$$$.

The louisville prostitution ring, sandusky molestations, and baylor rapes are truly horrific cases. The punishment for those violations should have been shutting down the athletic arm of the universities.


(Patrick) #82

I’m not sure it’s hypocrisy or if it’s just trying to figure out what the NCAA is supposed to be. If it’s a minor league, then pay the players and stop punishing schools for academics and “amateur-related” issues. If it’s for “school” and “amateurness” then actually enforce it across the board and get out of the business of trying to make as much money for the schools as possible. This arbitrary enforcement of penalties is beyond farcical and insulting to paying customers.

Edit to add: and here’s an NC State freshman getting punished for attending a class at Ohio State in May and having to sit out a year even though 1) his coach left 4 days after he started the class and 2) Ohio State released him with no restrictions. So, you’re punishing kids for going to class, but not punishing schools for fake classes?


(Patrick) #83

Or, probably more apt to this case, every year the NCAA releases APR scores. If those scores are too low for too long, a school can have penalties assessed against it. Most of the time, the schools affected are HBCUs, but UH was close at times and UCONN was retroactively punished in basketball.

With yesterday’s ruling, what is the point of these scores and penalties? If a school is worried about issues meeting the score, just create fake classes.


(Chris) #84

The ncaa is a farce at the service of the cartel:
Farce definition:
A comic dramatic work using buffoonery and horseplay and typically including crude characterization and ludicrously improbable situations.
Synonyms: mockery, travesty, absurdity, sham, pretense, masquerade, charade, joke, waste of time; informalshambles
"the trial was a farce"
The only way for this farce to stop is to have the FBI intervene. Why the FBI? Because these Schools get public money. Why should U of H or others be punished while others are not? No grounds for sanctions? What is a School supposed to be about? Education. What are fake classes? NON EDUCATION AND YOU ARE TEACHING THAT CHEATING IS RIGHT. WHAT KIND OF A LIFE LESSON IS THIS?
Is this the way we want to teach our youngest generations that cheating is right as long as you go to these Schools?
This proves again and again without a doubt what is the ncaa is all about. CORRUPT TO ITS CORE.


(Mike Hull) #85

Maybe the AAU will take these allegations more seriously and do something to UNC. They dropped Nebraska recently.

One can hope something remedial and more satisfying comes out of this.


(Patrick) #86

They did get put on probation by their accreditor. AAU should drop them just for that.


(Patrick) #87

North Carolina embarrassed the NCAA (and itself) in academic fraud case
https://sports.yahoo.com/north-carolina-blows-ncaa-smithereens-embarrassing-academic-fraud-defense-010926838.html

Carolina even changed its argument for the NCAA. When the school was in front of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, which accredits it as an actual university, it declared that no-show, no-professor, no-work classes were wrong.

“UNC reported to its accreditor that what occurred for nearly 18 years on its campus was academic fraud,” the NCAA report stated. ” … Specifically, UNC admitted [it] demonstrated that, ‘the academic fraud was long-standing.’”


(Patrick) #88

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/opinion/editorials/article182309151.html

Still, if the Committee was going to apply new rules to the UNC case, then it could have turned to a 2016 amendment dealing with academic misconduct. That new provision requires “all institutional staff members and student-athletes” to act with honesty and integrity in all academic matters. Would UNC have contended that the UNC employees involved in this sordid scandal acted with “honesty and integrity”? One can only hope not, but UNC never had to make that choice.


(Chris) #89

ncaa is corrupt to its core. Sports agents getting investigated by the FBI? What about the FBI investigating the ncaa. I come back to the point of public Schools getting public money, your money, my money.
Should not we demand equality for it? The ncaa obviously does not see it that way. Let’s call them for what they are. They are a fraud. Unfortunately we live in a society that has a five seconds attention span.
Here are the ncaa core values:


Now the 16 principles of conduct of intercollegiate athletics:

Can you all believe that they have the nerve to post this? These are noble but can anyone of us believe any of this? They do not obey by their own rules but wants you to believe that they do.


(Patrick) #90

This could be interesting:

http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/education/unc-scandal/article183717756.html

But UNC did not stand behind the classes in 2013 when the accrediting commission first looked into the scandal. UNC staved off sanctions from the accreditor by agreeing not to honor “paper” classes taken by students who needed them to graduate.

“It does raise the question of what did you really do?” said Belle Wheelan, president of the accreditor, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, of UNC. “… and at worst we should probably ask that question.”

She said of the infractions committee report: “We’re working through the report. It says a lot, but it says nothing, so we are trying to ferret out what it actually says.”


(Chris) #91

Every which way that I can rationalize this I always come back to the same conclusion. An FBI investigation is the only way to stop the cartel. A couple of questions that should matter.
What’s the difference between a P5 School getting 10 times the amount of a G5 Team for the same bowl game and a teen trying to get the most money to play at a program and the same program willing to pay for it? Sorry for the long question.
The G5’s were forced/coerced to sign the cfp agreement. Both go against every points that make the ncaa code of ethics. The FBI can draw a fine line. Div I Schools want to compete in sports? You have to do it on an even playing field. That means all Div I can compete which is not the case now. They do not with the cfp therefore all public funds should be cut off from P5 Schools. Why should my tax Dollars go to P5 Schools while my Alma matter has no chance to compete for the highest prize? Remember title IX? What is the difference with P5 and non P5. This is clear discrimination and should be deemed illegal.
The P5 Teams do not agree? How would their balance sheets look without federal funds? How many grants are supported by Federal funds? This is our tax money going to uta, ucla, alabama etc…
Enough with this constant BS about belonging or not. We are either a DIV I or not? What’s the point of having a DIV I if some DIV I Teams are excluded?
cfp ranking? It is held behind closed doors. It is an opinion of a very few. That’s sums up how corrupt this cfp is. The top of the cartel Teams want to break away? How interesting would it be for the rest of the country besides these 10 or 12 geographical areas? Can you imagine a competition with so few Teams? Football is in enough trouble that after the initial interest that competition would die too.
Football fans, sports fans want the underdog to win. In this type of competition you no longer have an underdog.


(Patrick) #92

Looks like the accreditor won’t come down on UNC either. Interesting article in the News Observer about the interview with the head of the agency and how she turned around afterwards and denied the article’s quotes when talking to UNC. Shady stuff.



#93

Maybe the largest legitimate public university in North Carolina can make it a sweep today against those cheating SOBs.


(Patrick) #94

Go Pack


(Patrick) #95

“If you’re going to promise education, and you say this is our big benefit to you is giving you a potential to make $1 million more over your lifetime because we give you a great education, then you say the classes we gave you weren’t valid,” Robinson said, “then I have a real problem with that and that’s probably the most damaging thing I’ve seen personally.”


#96

Too bad the NCAA isn’t going to do anything about this.


(Chris) #97

Too bad? For the millionth time and I hate to repeat myself but this is what the ncaa is all about.
They have a set of rules (you better obey by them) for some (G5’s) and another set for others (P5’s)
When you come to this realization the ncaa has to be reformed from its core.


(Patrick) #98

The legal, public relations and investigative bills cover several aspects of the university’s handling of the situation involving 18 years of classes that had no instruction and only required a term paper or two that drew high grades. Nearly 190 of those classes were listed as lecture-style classes in university publications; hundreds more were listed as independent studies.

Deborah Crowder, a former administrative aide in the African and Afro-American Studies department, created and graded most of the classes. When she retired in 2009, academic counselors for the football team requested her boss, department chairman Julius Nyang’oro, continue them, which he did until The N&O’s reporting exposed the classes in 2011.


(Chris) #99

“On the bright side from all this, the school claims that none of the money used to defend themselves came from tuition or state appropriations.”
…So who is paying for it?


(Patrick) #100

Donors most likely