Was Coleman doping at Tennessee & should Cameron Burrell have won the 2017 ncaa final?

The title of this thread is a handful but this is what came out today.

Not only did he miss one but he missed three required whereabout locations for possible PED testing. Maybe just maybe he could have missed one. Three that is no longer a possible human error. The questions/investigations are now underway. It would be interesting to find out the PED testing that the ncaa uses for T&F.

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Not sure…NCAA does drug test at the championships so he would have had to pass a drug test to be named champion. Doesn’t mean that he didn’t do something that is undetectable by their tests, though.

What would be interesting to know is if the ncaa uses the USADA “services”.
We all know how easy it has been for football (just an example) players to beat drug tests.
He should miss the Olympics.

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Good read:

In the article it states that the athlete has to let the organization know where they will be for 1 hour a day every day, 365 days a year. I suppose it’s an online system he is suppose to update every day.

Under the ‘whereabouts’ system, athletes must let officials know where they will be for one hour every day as well as details of overnight accommodation and training.

Failure to do so three times in a 12-month period could lead to a rule violation under the World Anti-Doping code.

So out of 365 days in a year, he missed 3. I’m not siding with the young man. I’m trying to understand the process. It’s one thing if they tested you and they found something in your system but it’s a different thing if it’s a technicality.

So say he fills out the data for 35 days then he misses one, then he fills it out for 45 more days and he misses another day.

  • Do they warn them after 1 or 2 misses?
  • How would he know the exact day they are testing him so he would purposely not let them know where he is that day?
  • Why would he fill out the data for many days then skip one knowing that drugs stay in your system for more than one day risk being tested the day after.

It seems like the whereabouts rule is a deterrent and if you break the rules you suffer the consequences.

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This will be interesting to see how it develops. I wonder how many times he was tested and when he was tested after the missed dates. Regardless, he broke a rule so I wonder if they would be able to let him slide. This might help Burrell make the US team for the Olympics, but could cost the US the gold medal.

These are the rules:


It is not rocket science. Keep in mind that he is a professional athlete with an agent. This is without mentioning trainers, Coaches etc…
The biggest question is why did he miss it once? Twice?? Thrice???
The reason you have these rules is to make an attempt to minimize doping. Just to think that Justin Gatlin is even still racing is beyond comprehension. How many times did Gatlin cheat?

Track and field is awesome. A guy like Gatlin should have been banned for life after his second positive test. Just think of the “clean” athletes (there are plenty) that quit the sport because it is not worth it in their mind.
It is hard to give Coleman the benefit of the doubt when this happened three times.

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WADA cited Coleman’s first failure to report his whereabouts on April 1, 2018, rather than the date it actually occurred: June 6, 2018. The sprinter’s final violation occurred on April 26, 2019.

Because three failures technically did not happen in 12 months, USADA dropped the case.

To avoid future confusion, the rule is being rewritten, and is anticipated to take effect in 2021.

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Thank you for posting. It still does not explain why he missed those. Remember that a certain Gatlin was reinstated…twice. The USADA keeps being associated with controversy. That is not what a National doping agency is supposed to do.

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Lot of folks in the track community not happy about this ruling. Top US 110m hurdler has the same issue, but wasn’t cleared.

Why have rules if you aren’t going to enforce them.

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You would have thought they would have learned from the Armstrong fiasco.

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He was tested 11 times in 2019 so far! Usain Bolt was probably tested 11 times his whole career, lol.

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It still does not explain why he missed two, That is leaving the door wide open for reasonable speculations. He choose to miss two. The very fact that Gatlin was not banned for life reflects where we are today.